Colours of Burano

Colourful houses on either side of the canal in Burano, Italy, captured by travel blogger Cee Fardoe of Coco & veraA stone tower at a winery on the island of Mazzorbo, Italy, captured by travel blogger Cee Fardoe of Coco & VeraA narrow lane of brightly coloured houses on Burano, Italy, as captured by travel blogger Cee Fardoe of Coco & VeraPastel houses line the canal in Burano, Italy, captured by travel blogger Cee Fardoe of Coco & VeraTwo bicycles lean against a yellow house on the island of Mazzorabo in the Venetian Lagoon, captured by travel blogger Cee Fardoe of Coco & VeraBrightly coloured houses line the canal on the island of Burano in Italy, captured by travel blogger Cee Fardoe of Coco & VeraPink and blue houses in a narrow laneway on Burano, Italy, captured by travel blogger Cee Fardoe of Coco & Vera

The colours of Burano are what define the Italian island, at least to outsiders. It may sound strange considering my penchant for all neutral shades, but on reflection, I think it was colours that made me fall in love with Europe all those years ago. Winnipeg is beige. I remember that from my childhood, but it strikes me again on a daily basis now that I live here. The vintage architecture of the city I call home is beautiful, but it is utterly devoid of colour.

But I digress, because this isn’t about Winnipeg, it’s about Burano. And the word Burano is synonymous with colour. The buildings on the island are all vibrant, the hue of each one in contrast with the next. At first glance, the streets look like they were drawn by an enthusiastic six-year-old with a new 64 pack of crayons. And yet, when you look closer, it becomes clear that nothing about the local colour is haphazard. No two houses of the same colour stand next to each other. Each street works with a specific set of shades that differs from the shades on the street next to it. In reality, it seems, someone with a keen artistic eye chose the colours of Burano.

Taking a walk in Italy is a bit like walking through an artist’s tableau. Every city is different – Rome is glamourous and steeped in history, while Venice is palatial. Burano is more rustic; the construction of the buildings is simple, and fresh laundry often hangs from them so it can dry in the warm air. The colours give the town an air of warmth that makes it feel like the sort of place where you could, concievably, just knock on a door without knowing who lived inside.

My favourite part of visiting Venice was seeing the colours of Burano, without a doubt. The island is well worth a detour if you’re in the region – and worth a full trip, if you aren’t.

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Comments

  1. I love the idea of embracing color, it’s so rare to see here, a house deviating from grey or white or brown, even when something is a color, its subdued. I think it’s the reason why I dream of living in an old Victorian house, since they’ve somehow escaped the dull color mandate and get to be bright and fun. Of course I often think I’d happily trade my current life to go and live in Italy, especially by the water, even more so if I could live in a cute blue house.
    http://www.iamchiconthecheap.com/

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